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Pyeattsville

Pyeattsville, Indiana, USA

The village of Pyeattsville was established in 1830 in Luce township, Spencer County, on Little Pigeon Creek about seven miles from where this creek empties into the Ohio River, better known as Boner Bridge.

Another view of Boner Bridge.

Boner Bridge is thought to be one of only five of its kind in the United States. The one-lane, iron bow, string-trussed bridge has sandstone abutments, iron bents and a wood plank floor. It is unique because it is known as a three-span bridge as it contains three arches. The two arches on both ends of the bridge measure 50 feet in length. The middle arch is the bridge's longest, measuring 160 feet. It was re-floored and repainted in 1931.

A headstone on the 260 foot bridge said the structure was completed in 1866. The headstone reads
_ _ CTND A.D. 1866 N G DUBOIS
_ _ BRENNER SUPERINTENDENT'S
_ _ TRIBBE II II WILBERN &
SONS BRIDGE CONNTRACTARS
_ _ A PFAFFLIN CIVIL ENGINER
The lines indicate illegible letters. The spelling is as it appears on the stone.

A larger view of the headstone.

At its beginning, there was a water mill that ground grain. It was run by water power furnished by the current of the creek. It is said that Tom Lincoln and his son, Abe, brought their corn to this mill to be made into meal, while the Lincoln family lived in Spencer County.

There were four streets named at that time; Water, Main, Locust, and Elm Streets. The first store was a small log building located on what was called Water Street. It was operated by John Burns. there was also a blacksmith shop on the same street operated by Fred Diggy. There were only two dwelling houses at that time, one of which stands today (1934). It is nearly ninety-four years old and is the residence of William J. Scheessele. At this place there is, also, an old well, which is probably the oldest well still in use.

On Water Street is located an elm tree which is known as the oldest and largest in Luce township.

The Rockport Democrat, November 23, 1934